Who Will Tell Them?

Central ParkCentral Park is a great place. Suddenly, you are out of the hustle and bustle of New York City, and you are experiencing trees and water, people enjoying times with their children, a ride on the Ferris wheel, an ice cream cone, or some time to just sit on a park bench, feed the birds, or read a newspaper. The park is, for many, an oasis.

But here are the thoughts that kept coming to my mind as I recently shouldered my way through the crowds and sat and watched parents with their kids in Central Park: Who of them know Jesus as their Lord and Savior? How many of them really know how much God loves them? And, if they don’t know, who will tell them? Of course, there were street preachers — but no one really stopped to listen. I’m sure many of the people I saw are believers, but likely, the majority have never been born again.

So what? Well, the next question is, what do we do with John 3:18: “But whoever does not believe stands condemned”? My answer: Take our evangelistic task seriously and work harder. Double our passion. Be intentional. Never give up on anyone. Reach and preach for a decision.

 "Apostle Paul on Trial" by Nikolai Bodarevsky

“Apostle Paul on Trial” by Nikolai Bodarevsky

Do you recall the incident in Acts 26 when Paul was in a discussion with King Agrippa? Paul had been called insane by the king, but the apostle would not be silenced. The king finally asked Paul if he, in such a short time, would try to persuade him to be a Christian. Remember Paul’s response? “Short time or long — I pray to God that not only you but all who are listening to me today may become what I am, except for these chains” (v. 29). That was a debate Paul won — yet, in the world’s view, lost.

Today, this is still our great challenge. How can we as pastors and Christian leaders make such a compelling case for salvation in Christ that people will be persuaded to accept it? The most important decision people will ever make is not who will be president, but where they will spend eternity. This is one debate we dare not lose. We must care deeply and fight endlessly for their souls. However, don’t forget that we do not work alone. The Holy Spirit prepares the hearts of others and ultimately convinces them of their need for a savior as we serve beside Him.

The scripture is pretty plain. “Jesus answered, ‘I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me’” (John 14:6).

“Salvation is found in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given to men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12).

faith-in-jesus-christ-alone-250x250I know we must be tolerant of other faiths — even though, when I was a kid, I thought the only ones getting into heaven had to believe like me. But I worry how healthy it is for the church to become so inclusive and accepting that, in our preaching and teaching, we fail to draw a very important line in the sand that cannot be compromised — namely, faith in Jesus Christ alone.

During our Sunday school days, we memorized a lovely verse: “For God [whose God?] so loved the world [what world?] that He gave His one and only Son, that whoever [anyone?] believes [accepts] in Him [as God’s only Son] shall not perish [be lost], but have eternal [forever!] life [in heaven with God].”

The bottom line for all of us, my colleague, remains — “Is anyone being saved here?” How do we return to that passion? We do it by pointing people from survival to surrender, to the power and love of God. That is our answer. And, by the way, thank you for all you do to point people to Jesus!

“This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth. For there is one God and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Timothy 2:3-5).

As we take our evangelistic responsibility seriously, we cannot depend on the personal crises or scary events in the world to drive men and women into the church, or even to Christ. The only thing that will accomplish that goal is for mankind to realize that they are lost without Jesus. Foxhole conversions are few and far between, and not particularly lasting. The most effective way to turn people’s hearts to God is through the genuine witness of those who have embraced our Lord and who, with childlike excitement, share that good news (Mark 16:15).

franklin-avenue-baptist-congregation-250x160Each Sunday (or weekend) gives us clergy the opportunity to encourage our people to live lives of faith and courage, to engage their friends and family in meaningful conversation about the value of being born again (John 3:7). Is there a more important message? I think not.

An elderly pastor once quoted an old saying to me: “Don’t forget, son. The light that shines brightest at home can be seen farthest away!” The light of your local church ministry should shine so brightly that the world is influenced by its vitality and vision. Pastor, encourage your people to be light in a dark world.

“You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven” (Matthew 5:14-16).

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